Manitoba Conservatives cancelled road improvements where 3 boys killed

The Pallister government confirms it cancelled plans to pave a rutted, gravel road into Nelson House First Nation in northern Manitoba, where three boys were allegedly struck and killed by a motorist April 28.

It also extended condolences to the community.

“Our hearts and prayers go out to the families touched by this tragic accident that occurred on Highway 620,” said a spokesperson for Manitoba Infrastructure Monday.

“We do hope that those who have committed this (alleged) act are brought to justice.”

A 27-year-old man from the community is accused of impaired driving and related offences in connection with the fatal crash.

Nelson House Chief Marcel Moody told APTN News the Tory government “reprioritized” the $5-million asphalting project when it came to power in 2016.

“We actually had a commitment from the (former) NDP (government) to get that done,” Moody said.

He called it a “dangerous road” without any lighting.

The government spokesman said the department was in the process of revising its five-year program and would review the Nelson House project.

12 thoughts on “Manitoba Conservatives cancelled road improvements where 3 boys killed

  1. I hear what you’re saying, Blaine. But I can’t help wondering what the reaction would have been if were some white kids that had been killed. Would we ask what the kids were doing on a dark road at that hour if the night? Whether we like to admit it not, we put on ‘tinted lenses’ when we’re talking about Native Indian populations…’they’ shouldn’t be out that late on a dark road, ‘they’ should get over things…
    We’ve never walked a mile in those shoes yet we feel entitled to judge and wonder why ‘they’ make poor choices!

    1. Fariday, my wife is a Metis social work student who intends to work with DOCFS, her Native father, who has early dementia induced by heroin and meth use, lives with us, and we’ve fostered many Aboriginal children over the years, so I like to think I’m more informed and qualified to speak on these issues than your average white guy. I understand the challenges that are faced by Aboriginal people due to intergenerational trauma resulting from colonial policies of the Canadian government. The reason I wince when I read articles like this is because I know how many white people wear these “tinted lenses” when viewing Aboriginal people. Blaming the government for failing to improve a road when a drunk driver was clearly at fault reinforces their opinion that Aboriginal people are just a bunch of freeloading whiners that don’t take any responsibility for their own lives, always play the victim, and expect the government to do everything for them. Saying “It’s the government’s fault” in situations like this undermines credibility for the many situations where there the government is legitimately to blame. It’s bad for race relations and sets back reconciliation efforts.

  2. You can’t blame not having asphalt, as a reason the 27 year old was drinking and driving! With or without asphalt the outcome would gave been the same when the idiot chose to drink and drive. He’ll have a long time to think of his choice and how it shortened three young lives…

  3. I hear what you’re saying, Blaine. But I can’t help wondering what the reaction would have been if were some white kids that had been killed. Would we ask what the kids were doing on a dark road at that hour if the night? Whether we like to admit it not, we put on ‘tinted lenses’ when we’re talking about Native Indian populations…’they’ shouldn’t be out that late on a dark road, ‘they’ should get over things…
    We’ve never walked a mile in those shoes yet we feel entitled to judge and wonder why ‘they’ make poor choices!

    1. Fariday, my wife is a Metis social work student who intends to work with DOCFS, her Native father, who has early dementia induced by heroin and meth use, lives with us, and we’ve fostered many Aboriginal children over the years, so I like to think I’m more informed and qualified to speak on these issues than your average white guy. I understand the challenges that are faced by Aboriginal people due to intergenerational trauma resulting from colonial policies of the Canadian government. The reason I wince when I read articles like this is because I know how many white people wear these “tinted lenses” when viewing Aboriginal people. Blaming the government for failing to improve a road when a drunk driver was clearly at fault reinforces their opinion that Aboriginal people are just a bunch of freeloading whiners that don’t take any responsibility for their own lives, always play the victim, and expect the government to do everything for them. Saying “It’s the government’s fault” in situations like this undermines credibility for the many situations where there the government is legitimately to blame. It’s bad for race relations and sets back reconciliation efforts.

  4. You can’t blame not having asphalt, as a reason the 27 year old was drinking and driving! With or without asphalt the outcome would gave been the same when the idiot chose to drink and drive. He’ll have a long time to think of his choice and how it shortened three young lives…

  5. Doesn’t the spokesman for the Minister (oh the irony) sound like a Catholic priest blaming the Indians for the sexual abuse at the residential school? What the Conservative Minister and his minion seem to miss is that it is their government whichhelped to create the circumstances for this tragedy in much the same way that their idol Conservative, Sir John A MaDonald created the circumstances for the abuse of children in residential schools. Grow some balls Pallister and come out of hiding.

    1. I think we can all agree that residential schools have had terrible, long-lasting consequences for Aboriginal people, but to blame this tragedy on this historical injustice or the present government’s cancellation of a road upgrade is stretching things. An individual made a decision to drive while impaired. It wasn’t the road, it wasn’t the lighting, it was the drunk driver. And why were these children wandering down a unlit road by themselves in the dark at 10:30 pm? At some point Aboriginal people are going to need to realize that the government, Conservative, Liberal, or NDP, isn’t going to fix their problems. No amount of money will, either. A better future lies in individual people understanding that just because they are victims doesn’t mean they are powerless. Fix the things that are within your power to fix. Decide not to drive drunk. Decide not to let your kids wander on the road in the dark at night. Don’t let the injustices of the past determine your destiny. There are so many little things you can do every day to make a better life for you and those around you.

  6. Doesn’t the spokesman for the Minister (oh the irony) sound like a Catholic priest blaming the Indians for the sexual abuse at the residential school? What the Conservative Minister and his minion seem to miss is that it is their government whichhelped to create the circumstances for this tragedy in much the same way that their idol Conservative, Sir John A MaDonald created the circumstances for the abuse of children in residential schools. Grow some balls Pallister and come out of hiding.

    1. I think we can all agree that residential schools have had terrible, long-lasting consequences for Aboriginal people, but to blame this tragedy on this historical injustice or the present government’s cancellation of a road upgrade is stretching things. An individual made a decision to drive while impaired. It wasn’t the road, it wasn’t the lighting, it was the drunk driver. And why were these children wandering down a unlit road by themselves in the dark at 10:30 pm? At some point Aboriginal people are going to need to realize that the government, Conservative, Liberal, or NDP, isn’t going to fix their problems. No amount of money will, either. A better future lies in individual people understanding that just because they are victims doesn’t mean they are powerless. Fix the things that are within your power to fix. Decide not to drive drunk. Decide not to let your kids wander on the road in the dark at night. Don’t let the injustices of the past determine your destiny. There are so many little things you can do every day to make a better life for you and those around you.

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