Vancouver lit up in red to honour missing and murdered Indigenous women


More than a dozen family members and advocates shut down Cambie street in downtown Vancouver on the day to remember loved lost daughters, sons and friends.

“No Indigenous woman should ever be murdered on their own territory shame. Canada needs to step up and seek justice for Indigenous people and Indigenous women,” said MC Jerilynn Webster as she spoke into a microphone. “When I say no more you say stolen sisters – no more! Stolen sisters. No more! Stolen sisters.”

Banners were then dropped from the Cambie St. bridge to help raise awareness – showing pictures missing or murdered loved ones – they represent daughters, sisters, mothers, nieces, aunts and friends.

At city hall, more than 100 people were there including elementary school kids who helped sing the women’s warrior song as red dresses hung in the trees symbolizing the thousands of murdered and missing women and girls across Canada.

Even the statue of Capt. Vancouver was utilized to spread the message.

Vancouver lit up
Capt. Vancouver with a red dress sits out front of city hall. Photo: Tina House/APTN.

Sheila Poorman’s Chelsea Poorman, 25, went missing Sept. 7, 2020 after going out with her sister for a night on the town in downtown Vancouver. They got separated and the last thing Chelsea told her sister on the phone was that she met a new boy. Then her phone was turned off. She hasn’t been heard from since.

“I made the missing person’s report September 8th the Vancouver police department did not put her in the media until about ten days later they did not check the video surveillance or the cameras in that area which was so disturbing because they lost a lot of time and they lost a lot of footage that could’ve helped,” Poorman told the crowd.

The Butterflies in Spirit dance group was wearing the picture of April Parisian. The 45 yeear old went missing in April 2020 near Spuzzum, B.C.

Police believe she may have met with foul play and has not been found.

The entire dance group has a missing or murdered family member.

Tabatha Frank is one of the dancers who spoke at the event.

“I dance to honour my Aunt Iris Frank. She was taken from us in 1980 and I also dance to honour my son, his name is Ethan he has an aunt named Lisa Marie Young, she went missing June 30th, 2002.”

As the event came to close everyone who attended prayed for answers as to what happened to their murdered and missing loved one and that justice prevail.

To conclude the National Memorial MMIWG Day – Vancouver lit up city hall and the Burrard Street Bridge in red to honour those that have been lost or murdered.

Video Journalist / Vancouver

A proud Métis from BC, Tina began her television career in 1997 as a talent agent for film and TV. She joined APTN National News in 2007 as a Video Journalist in the Vancouver bureau. In 2010, she was the recipient of the Amnesty International Human Rights Journalism Award for her story on murdered and missing women and girls.