Senator Beyak agrees to meet residential school survivors … in the summer

Video Journalist / Thunder Bay

Willow is an Oji-Cree Anishinabe from Sandy Lake First Nation. Her background is in print journalism and she studied multimedia before entering broadcast news . She is passionate about the stories of the Anishinabe in northwestern Ontario, particularly in the remote north.

4 thoughts on “Senator Beyak agrees to meet residential school survivors … in the summer

  1. Where did she get her information from to think that there was ANY good…my mother was a residential school who barely survived life there and afterwards…families are being ripped apart..our brothers and sisters bring taught how to rape..murder..lie…shown they don’t have to respect anything or anyone…memories being empty … my sisters and brother ended in Sask. CFS care (part of the scoop of the 60’s) .. we were forcibly taken from our father and seperated into 2 foster homes..i heard some stories from my younger siblings about the hurting they went through at the home they were in…3 eldest (myself as the eldest) were placed together..the 1st home was to clean and sexually satisfy the man and son of the home…the second home was ok except for the farmhand who took my sister in the barn..the 3rd home was the worst…so bad I have blocked most of that time out..a couple of memories pop up from that 3rd one but 97% of that time is gone from my memories..we were taught how to clean and satisfy a man…we were given to our mom after that…a mom who now drank who never used to..she smoked…she had boyfriends..she was very diffrent from before..residential school showed me what horrible people they created and the horribleness was carried forward to their own children…WHERE IS THE GOOD PART ???

  2. It would be beneficial if the senator heard as well from a granddaughter and niece, namely myself, to share how the hurtful, unknowing, reality my grandmother endured through out the years of her life. lack of information and knowledge of how her 8 year old son died in the residential school as well as her 13 year old daughter also having died in the residential school. Closure didn’t come to my Kokum (grandmother), she past on never knowing what transpired before and during the deaths of her children and afterwards. She made ever opportunity to share this huge loss of her children to her grandchildren, myself, and her sons and daughters, who have all since past on. As shared with me by my Kokum, I in turn share these deaths of my little uncle and auntie, with my children, grandchildren as well as my sisters and brothers and their children. this is not easy has not been easy and will never be easy for us. It is hurts like this that linger on in our lives forever, like it did my Kokum and her family. Unless one was there, you have no clue the hurt, and the tear that leaves a family so desperate to forget or put it aside. it is a genuine hurt that some one could make statements of such as the senator did. need to hear actually what she was implying and what was the basis behind and for the comment. empty and will not allow this fade. Consider one’s hurt before speaking with a run away tongue.

    1. Your story is so very sad,Gov.s’ and Church were both involved and trickery was amuk,As time went on conditions on some reserves never improved while some has prospered,however greed is rampant with chief and the people are limited to income, I M.O. Reserves are passe for the good of the future children, our past history has destroyed your culture and almost impossible to repair. Our thought are with you and wish you well.

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