First Nations invested in marijuana selected to open Manitoba retail stores

“(Marijuana is) no different than the fur trade a couple hundred years ago.”

Several First Nations in Manitoba invested in the recreational marijuana business got some good news Friday.

Manitoba has picked four companies to open retail stores in the province once it is legal, as expected this summer.

Fisher River Cree Nation, teamed up with a consortium of Ontario and American businesses, was picked.

National Access Cannabis is another company, which has teamed up with Brokenhead, Longplain, Peguis, Nelson House and Opaskwayak First Nations.

“The Manitoba government is very interest in retail opportunities and economic development and felt it was important to include in our request for proposals a component for Indigenous communities to be involved,” said Blaine Pedersen, minister of Growth, Enterprise and Trade.

Opaskwayak Cree Nation Chief Christian Sinclair it’s no different than one of the first items traded in Canada.

“This is an emerging market and it’s no different than the fur trade a couple hundred years ago where Indigenous people would benefit from that industry,” said Sinclair. “We see this as a similar opportunity where were getting in on the ground floor.”

Host, Producer / Winnipeg

Melissa is a proud Red River Metis and award-winning journalist who has spent more than 24 years covering crime, courts, politics, business and entertainment for newspapers in four provinces.
She then joined APTN Investigates in 2009 and APTN National News in 2018 and in that time has garnered numerous awards and nominations including from the World Indigenous Television Broadcasters Network (2013), Canadian Association of Journalists (2016, 2019) and Canadian Screen Awards (2018, 2019).

6 thoughts on “First Nations invested in marijuana selected to open Manitoba retail stores

  1. As a person interested in medical uses of cannabis, I support the inclusion of First Nations in the industry and the profits. We should all work towards education for both medical and recreational uses. The progress towards regulation means that we can reach out to people who use cannabis in an irresponsible way, and can help to make it an asset. We humans need to work together.

  2. Hats off to the Pallister gov to allow First Nations to conduct business in the mj sector
    First Nations leaders are well educated , knowledgeable and will succeed well . Jobs will also be created to help others in their community

  3. As a person interested in medical uses of cannabis, I support the inclusion of First Nations in the industry and the profits. We should all work towards education for both medical and recreational uses. The progress towards regulation means that we can reach out to people who use cannabis in an irresponsible way, and can help to make it an asset. We humans need to work together.

  4. Hats off to the Pallister gov to allow First Nations to conduct business in the mj sector
    First Nations leaders are well educated , knowledgeable and will succeed well . Jobs will also be created to help others in their community

  5. Ongwehonwe People are free to set up a community based cannabis industry. It is already providing organic and plant based alternatives to big pharm business. Why be affiliated with the province? We have land, experience and the need to be self sufficient under treaty and rights.

  6. Ongwehonwe People are free to set up a community based cannabis industry. It is already providing organic and plant based alternatives to big pharm business. Why be affiliated with the province? We have land, experience and the need to be self sufficient under treaty and rights.

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