Fighting hunger in the North through healthy, country food


This week brought about an announcement and the release of a study by Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami about food insecurity in Inuit communities.

The report, called the Inuit Nunangat Food Security Strategy, states 76 per cent of Inuit adults in Canada have unreliable access to nutritious, affordable food.

ITK President Natan Obed called it a “shameful human rights violation.”

One of ITK’s recommendations is to make it easier to hunt and sell local foods — foods that many in Nunavut prefer.

At the Qajuqturvik Community Food Centre in Iqaluit, what Nunavummiut call country food is becoming a bigger part of the solution.

Qajuqturvik means “a place to get soup.”

But it’s much more than a soup kitchen.

APTN’s Kent Driscoll went there to talk with those who help to feed the hungry to see what the announcements mean to them.

Video Journalist / Iqaluit

Kent has been APTN’s Nunavut correspondent since 2007. In that time he has closely covered Inuit issues, including devolution and the controversial Nutrition North food subsidy. He has also worked for CKIQ-FM in Iqaluit and as a reporter for Nunavut News North.