Despite permission from hereditary chiefs, Wet’suwet’en camps inaccessible to some media

For almost a week, APTN News has been on the ground at the Wet’suwet’en camps in British Columbia.

It’s the site where some members of the Wet’suwet’en Nation are pushing back against work on the Coastal GasLinks pipeline.

The pipeline will run from northern B.C., 670 km to the Kitimat on the coast.

Our video journalist and videographer have been granted permission to travel to the camps by the hereditary chiefs, but despite this permission, Gidmt’en and Unist’ot’en spokespeople say the main camps are not accessible to us.

Video Journalist / Calgary

Tamara is Métis from Winnipeg, Manitoba. She received a diploma in interactive media arts at Assiniboine Community College in Brandon and has worked as a videographer for CBC in Winnipeg and Iqaluit. Tamara was hired by APTN in 2016 as a camera/editor and is now a video journalist in our Calgary bureau.


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