B.C. family offering $10K reward for information about daughter Chelsea Poorman

‘Chelsea you are really missed we just want you to come home.’


A family in Vancouver is putting up a $10,000 reward for information on the whereabouts of Chelsea Poorman, 24, who has been missing in the Vancouver area since Sept. 5, 2020.

“We love you, we miss you and we just want you home we want you to come home to us,” says her mother Sheila. “And if anybody seen her call the tip line go on her Facebook page.

“Chelsea you are really missed we just want you to come home.”

Sheila Poorman is also scouring the streets of Vancouver trying to dig up her own clues about what happened to her daughter.

She’s hoping the use of sweet confectionary may help lead to information.

Poorman is handing out bags of chocolate and candy, which include a business card and a photo of her daughter Chelsea.

“I hand these out when I’m on the bus or just walking on the street,” she says holding out one of the bags. “I always make sure I have a bag or two hoping that somebody recognizes her and knows her location.”

On the night she went missing, Chelsea and her sister Paige decided to go to Granville St. in Vancouver and have a night on the town.

Just after midnight, they went to a friend’s house nearby. Just after midnight, Chelsea left on her own.

Later, Paige called her and was told that she had met a guy.

That was the last time anyone heard from her.

Police put out a missing persons release, including the wrong date she went missing, on Sept. 18. 

She was last seen wearing a grey sweater, black lace crop top, black jeans, brown knee high boots and a beige purse. She’s 5’3 and walks with a slight limp.

Her family says Chelsea had only been in Vancouver for a short while and didn’t know anyone.

Anyone with information is asked to call police.

Video Journalist / Vancouver

A proud Métis from BC, Tina began her television career in 1997 as a talent agent for film and TV. She joined APTN National News in 2007 as a Video Journalist in the Vancouver bureau. In 2010, she was the recipient of the Amnesty International Human Rights Journalism Award for her story on murdered and missing women and girls.